Reconnect Comes to the Big Apple…And the Coastal Empire

Start spreading the news, we’re excited to announce today that Reconnect is now available in New York City.  With this expansion, New York State is now the fourth statewide Reconnect program.   Our partners at Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and Northern New Jersey are already a key part of the Reconnect team, they have been part of the New Jersey program since last year.  Today they join the programs in Western New York State and the Greater Rochester Area launched earlier this year to provide all residents of New York State free computer recycling.

Consumers in the Greater New York area can bring any brand of used computer in any condition to one of 31 drop-off locations, including seven in Manhattan, for free, convenient and responsible recycling.  (Statewide there are now 48 locations). The program keeps used computers out of the environment and helps support Goodwill’s important job training and creation work.  We expect to collect more than 1.65 million pounds of computers in the Greater New York area annually.

We’re also announcing today that Reconnect is available in the 29 Georgia counties and four South Carolina counties of the Coastal Empire and Low Country regions surrounding Savannah, Georgia.  Our partners at Goodwill Industries of the Coastal Empire plan to collect over 270,000 pounds of computer equipment annually at 30 drop-off locations across the region.

We’re continuing to work with Goodwill to expand Reconnect.  A few weeks ago the program expanded to the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Washington, D.C. area. With these new launches, Reconnect offers 636 locations for computer recycling in markets across the U.S. 

We have additional expansions coming soon and will share that news here. In the meantime, consumers outside of areas were Reconnect is available can always take advantage of Dell’s free and convenient recycling programs.  I caught up with Beth Johnson, Dell’s manager for the Reconnect program to talk about this launch and the importance of this program.

About the Author: Bryant Hilton