What is an M.2 Card and Why Should I Care?

The M.2 connector, formerly known as Next Generation Form Factor (NGFF), isn’t as hard to pronounce as a symbol for a name, but it’s faster in performance than its predecessors.

And we’ve seen a lot of interest this week in learning more about what an M.2 add-in card is actually.

“The M.2 format is designed for manufacturers to replace a variety of specific devices, do it in a tiny space, and require very little power,” How-to Geek explains. “But actually upgrading to an M.2 drive or accessory requires a little forethought.”

That’s why we have created a Dell Knowledge Base article that describes what the M.2 card is and some of the intended supported applications.

Dell XPS 2-in-1 laptop

Direct2Dell is designed to bring you news and stories about Dell people, products, services, partners and customers. Often those customers need support for their Dell products. For that, our Dell Support team continuously updates a library of articles called the Knowledge Base.

In an effort to make that information even easier to find when you need it, each Friday I will bring you a list of the most highly reviewed articles with appropriate responses to the latest trends we are seeing in our customer inquiries.

With these publications you can stay informed about the latest troubleshooting guides and resolutions across various client system lines.

Questions about these issues should be left in our Support Forums where trained staff are available to assist, rather than commenting here on Direct2Dell.

You can also contact Dell Customer Service or Dell Technical Support for assistance. And, as always, our @DellCares and @DellCaresPro teams are just a tweet away for help.

This week we’ve seen a lot of interest in these topics:

Shawn Burton

About the Author: Shawn Burton

I was Born and raised in England, moving to Texas in 2009. I’ve worked in various roles through Dell Technical Support since starting here in 2011, but by times currently focused on the development of our Social Media Technical Escalations team, where you’ll find me in social media publishing our technical content and hosting the Technical Support Webinar sessions. Hobbies: I’m not happy unless something needs fixing. You’ll usually find me at home with my hands are smeared with engine oil, covered with dirt from the garden, full of wood splinters, or poking around inside someone’s computer. Follow: @ShawnIBurton